netkingcol

thinking outside the tank

Captain Cook in Google Earth: migration to the web complete(ish)

leave a comment »

I have been working for a couple of weeks converting my Google Earth presentation of James Cook’s first voyage round the world so that it runs in a web browser using the Google Earth API.

All of the Google Earth ‘tours’ are now transferred to www.hazelhurst.net/Cook/ providing more than 15 hours of animation and audio. I hope that education and GIS professionals as well as those interested in adventure, exploration, and discovery, will find this presentation interesting and useful.

There are several advantages to the new site:

  1. The menu system makes it easy to find the part of the voyage that interests you.
  2. All of the legs of the voyage are accessible from the menu; previously you had to load each tour separately into the Google Earth application. The ‘ish’ in the title is there because I have not yet prepared the section of the voyage from Batavia to England and I have not included the passage from Cape Horn to Lagoon Island. For the sake of completeness I will add these sections at a later date.
  3. The tours in the presentation are each limited to about 10 minutes duration, and they now load much faster than they did in Google Earth.
  4. After completing a large part of this project I realised I needed some  automation tools. Consequently, I developed TourMaker which uses <ExtendedData> attached to <Placemark> elements to describe how the 3D model should be moved. This eliminates much of the manual effort required to create animations in Google Earth; this in turn made it easier to model Cook’s voyage in finer detail. I particularly like how Endeavour now rounds Cape Horn and later visits a string of South Seas islands both on the approach to Tahiti and on leaving that island after observing the transit of Venus.
  5. I have made fresh sound recordings of much of Cook’s journal; I bought a copy of WavePad to do this and, as in many other situations, I discovered the need to do the job twice: the first time to learn how to do it, and the second time to do it properly. The early recordings were rushed, the levels were inconsistent, and the sound effects were too prominent. I hope these issues are now resolved.

Copyright © Colin Hazlehurst, 2012

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: